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Cardinal De Donatis, Vicar General of Rome, is first cardinal known to have coronavirus


If St. Corona was not a plague saint before, she is now...


6 answers to coronavirus-related canonical questions...
Edward Peters
Since COVID19 left Communist China last month and began its rampage around the world a myriad of issues and problems have been confronting us all. Among these crisis items are a host of canonical questions, questions that arise on a daily, sometimes an hourly, basis and which take almost innumerable forms, often reformulating themselves before anything like coherent answers from informed persons or authorities can be formulated to their first instantiation...


We are all a ship full of vulnerables. Could this be our strength?
Kathryn Jean Lopez
There have been a few moments in recent weeks when this coronavirus experience suddenly hit me in a deeper way. We’re funny, humans. So one of us was when Amazon put books on the bottom of our priority list. Bookish type that I am, that is what Amazon is for me: books. And I’ve had a whole new rediscovery of those boo stores and distributors I used to rely on before Amazon made things so simple...


‘The Veil Removed’ — A 7-minute short film that will change the way you see the Holy Mass...


Get the Sunday morning prayer and Sunday Mass readings every week from Keep the Lord’s Day...


On Monday night, the Met is streaming a free live performance of Poulenc’s “Dialogues des Carmélites” about the martyrs of Compiègne (H/T Sister Helena Burns)...


In the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood in New York, Father George Rutler is helping keep faith alive during the coronavirus crisis...


Anxious about coronavirus? Family? Finances? The 33-day preparation for Consecration to St. Joseph starts today...


Pope Francis and reforms — He has never been more alone than now...
Andrea Gagliarducci
While Italy is locked down because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Holy See has nevertheless continued to work, though with less staff on site. Also, Pope Francis has kept seeing regularly the heads of dicasteries, according to the so-called “udienze di tabella” (pre-scheduled and recurrent according to a fix cycle). The life of the Church does not stop...


Six sisters from same Italian convent have died, as coronavirus spreads among religious orders...


Advice (and 5 tips) for teaching kids at home, from a veteran homeschool mom...


Why the blessing in St. Peter’s Square mattered...
Kevin Tierney
Yesterday, Pope Francis livestreamed a special Urbi et Orbi blessing (a blessing traditionally reserved for a new pope and the Church’s highest feasts), featuring Adoration and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. The purpose of this event was to beseech God for an end to the coronavirus pandemic sweeping through the globe, a pandemic which has shut down the majority of society for the world...


St. Thérèse of Lisieux and the pandemic...


Exposing the Blessed Sacrament “to the city and the world,” Pope Francis on Friday delivered an iconic image that stirred a country’s soul...
John Allen
Twenty years from now, if you were to ask Italians to think back about what images stuck in their minds from the coronavirus, it’s a good bet that after Friday night, many would give the same answer. “Papa Francesco standing alone in St. Peter’s Square, under the rain, praying for it to end,” they’d likely say. In one fell swoop Friday night...


You’re probably washing your hands wrong. Here’s how to do it...


Baptism as Resurrection: Readings for 5th Sunday of Lent...
John Bergsma
In the season of Lent, the Gospel of John becomes very prominent, especially in Year A, the readings of which can be used in any year that a parish is doing RCIA. Unlike the other Gospels, John recounts only a limited number of miracles of Jesus, which he designates as “signs,” a rare term in the other Gospels. Although John tells us of only a few miracles...


Need a laugh? Watch Leonard Nimoy sing “The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins”...
Philip Kosloski
J.R.R. Tolkien’s influence on pop-culture has had an enduring legacy ever since The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings were published. The universal (Catholic) messages found in Tolkien’s stories make them appealing to all people, no matter their belief system. In one of the most obscure (and hilarious..though also embarrassing) moments of pop-culture...

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New Advent is edited by Kevin Knight (webmasternewadvent.org)

In the story of Susanna we have a lesson on the anatomy of sin...
Msgr. Charles Pope
The first reading from Monday’s Mass (Monday of the 5th Week of Lent) is the story of Susanna, an extraordinary moral tale from the Book of Daniel. The full passage (which is quite lengthy) can be found here: Daniel 13:1-62. Interestingly, it is missing from Protestant bibles, which use a truncated version of the Book of Daniel...


‘OPChant’ on YouTube introduces Gregorian chant to a new generation...
Solène Tadié
In his letter to Cardinal Joseph Höffner for the Seventh International Congress of Sacred Music, John Paul II praised the unifying power of Gregorian chant within Catholic liturgy because of its “genuine sense of religion.” In his view, Gregorian chant was, compared to new sacred music, like a “statue in front of a painting...


6 skills for coronavirus “sheltering in place” that I learned by sailing across the Atlantic...


Take a fascinating, free online class on the Perpetual Virginity of Mary...


‘Blue Movie’ time again: Massive New York Times op-ed says the ‘pew gap’ is real and growing...
Terry Mattingly
It’s deja vu time, all over again. Again and again. This week’s “Crossroads” podcast (click here to tune that in) felt like one long time-travel ride in the WABAC machine (think “Rocky and Bullwinkle”) or Doctor Who’s TARDIS. Let’s start at the beginning. Way back in 2003, I read an article in The Atlantic Monthly that — more than any other — made me start thinking about creating some kind of website about how many (not all) reporters in the mainstream press struggle to see the role that religion plays in public life...


No matter when you look at your clock, some priest is offering Mass for you...


Rare Yosemite Falls rainbow phenomenon — ‘This is the sign of the covenant’...


Some Good News you’ll want to see from John Krasinski (and Steve Carell) of ‘The Office’...


On going to our own house...


Springfield’s Bishop Rozanski doubles down on debacle, tells priests to refuse sacramental anointing to the sick and dying...


Sherlock Holmes and the haunting of Arthur Conan Doyle...
K.V. Turley
Walking through Edinburgh’s West End, early one winter morning, I spied a familiar face. The unmistakable features of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle looked down upon me from an impressive Victorian town house. Below a larger than life portrait there was a sign; it announced: “The Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Centre.” I made a mental note...


Sunday Angelus Message: God is life and gives life, yet takes on the drama of death...
Pope Francis
The Gospel passage of this fifth Sunday of Lent is that of the resurrection of Lazarus. Lazarus was the brother of Martha and Mary; they were good friends of Jesus. When He arrives in Bethany, Lazarus has already been dead for four days; Martha runs towards the Master and says to Him: “If you had been here, my brother would not have died...


Wanted: spiritual leadership during a medical crisis...
Phil Lawler
Over the course of this past weekend I heard of several different ingenious schemes, concocted by energetic pastors, that would have allowed Catholics to attend Mass without violating “social distance” or government regulations. In every case the plan was vetoed by the diocesan bishop. Yes, I understand that bishops are concerned about the possible transmission of a deadly virus— but so are the pastors who invented ways to allow parishioners to worship in small groups...


Vatican tests 170 people for coronavirus, says Pope Francis does not have virus...


Untie him and let him go free: A homily for the 5th Sunday of Lent...


Why Jesus wept...
Fr. Victor Feltes
Why did Jesus weep on his way to Lazarus’ tomb? Was it because he had only just learned of his dear friend Lazarus’ death? No, for Jesus had known long before he arrived at the village. He had already told his disciples, “Lazarus has died. And I am glad for you that I was not there, that you may believe.” Did Jesus weep because he had not planned to immediately resurrect Lazarus until sorrow changed his mind...


Should Catholic politicians act on what the Church teaches?


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